Category Archives: embroidery

Cross Stitch Mini Sampler

Sorry for my long absence, I was so busy at my day job. For almost mindless stitching, I added a cross stitch section to one of my sampler bands.
The cross stitch alphabets came from an old DMC publication, which you can download here.
The rest of the design just happened, the back stitch letters are my own.
SK are my real life initials. The saying, two lines of a song by The Tremeloes was, at that moment, about all the things you experience when working with people.

The piece was stitched on an almost evenweave dress linen, about 26 threads/13 crosses per inch using 2 strands of Anchor floss for the cross stitches and #12 pearl cotton by DMC for the back stitching.

By the way, I think it is funny how much you read about cross stitch in embroidery blogs recently. Are these the beginnings of a trend or something?

silence-031115


Stitch Sunday Inspiration: Whipped Connected Fly Stitch

Earlier this week, I introduced spaced connected fly stitches used to depict plants. Like I wrote before, the mid line of such a plant sprig can be whipped to make it more pronounced.

First, do a prig of connected fly stitches. If you want to depict a plant, pay attention to start it neatly and give it an organic form. Avoid making it too regular.

ss9b1-230815

Next, whip the mid line like you would a row of back stitches. Always run the needle under the stitches from the same side so the thread goes over the midline stitches.

ss9b2-230815

Behold the finished twig.

ss9b3-230815


Stitch Sunday 8 – Beaded Fly Stitch

So this is Stitch Sunday 7. this time it is fly stitch, and because regular fly stitch was part of TAST I am making it beaded fly stitch.

It is fitting that fly stitch is shown after a chain stitch variant, because fly stitch is a sort of link between the buttonhole/feather/cretan stitch family and the chain stitch family. On the one hand, it could be a sniplet of a feather stitch, on the other hand, it could be seen as a wide open detatched chain stitch.

Like most chain stitches, fly stitch can be done by doing the tacking stitch first and then threading through the loop, or by making a loop and then tacking it down with a stitch. Here I am using the latter method.

For beaded fly stitch, first put an even number of beads on the working thread.

fly1-010815

Next, insert the needle at the other end of the loop, and have it come out again where the tacking stitch is supposed to be. Make sure half of the beads are on each side of the place you come up with the needle.- If you haven’t beaded the loop but want to bead the tacking stitch, put the required number of beads onto the working thread after this step.

fly2-010815

At last, complete the tacking stitch and take the needle to the place where the next stitch is supposed to begin.

fly3-010815

Of course, you can also work the tacking stitch first. In case you work with the fabric in a hoop and work stab action, this is recommended. In this case, first do a little straight stitch that is the tacking stitch. Bring the needle to the front where the loop is supposed to start. put half of the required beads on the working thread. Slide the needle under the tacking stitch without piercing the fabric. Put the rest of the beads on the thread. Sink the needle where the loop is supposed to end.

Was this clear enough without pics?


Stitch Sunday 6 – Woven and Buttonholed Feathered Chain

Last sunday I showed you how to embellish feathered chain stitch by weaving the little leaves.

This makes a quite attractive plant. But, the stem of it is a little flimsy. You can change that by buttonholing over it.

You probably ended the weaving at the top of the plant. Now you wrap the working thread around the stem like you would do wrapped zigzag stitch.

wovenfeather10-110715

wovenfeather12-110715

Next, start working buttonhole stitches over the stem. Make sure the buttonhole stitches point to the outside of the zigzac.

woven buttonholed feathered chain

woven buttonholed feathered chain

When you arrive at the leaf, take to the needle to the other side of it so you can again work the buttonhole stitches to the outside.

wovenfeather8-280615

Finished!

wovenfeather9-280615


Stitch Sunday Inspiration – the New Sampler

This is the top section of my new sampler band. There is an example of free form feathered chain stitch. The lavander dots are tiny woven wheels. They are done without padding, do you know the trick to make them stand up like that? Or should I make them a stitch sunday stitch one day?

ss-020715


Stitch Sunday Inspiration: Woven Roses

Everyone commented how my woven buttonhole wheels look like roses. Of course, that is a classic use of woven wheels done in Ribbon. Sorry to the ribbon embroidery fans if my work on this looks amateurish, I have never really learnt propper ribbon embroidery.

So I got a spool of organza ribbon, this was the only ribbon like thing and the only colour form the red family I could get without undertaking a trip across town (for which I had no time) so I went ahead with it.

First, I drew a little rambler rose twig and transferred it onto my current sampler using a fine liner. Then I stitched a buttonhole wheel. Roses are supposed to have 5 groups of petals, but I did the circles too big so I stitched 7 spokes. No one except the nature freaks are going to notice. Then I came up with the organza band in the middle and started weaving round and round.

woven wheel rose

The weaving was hard going because the buttonhole wheel lost stability from tugging on it. I kept tugging on the spokes after every stitch to keep them from wrapping around the organza. Later on the buttonloe wheel was pushed back into shape by the mass of organza band. In the last row, I wove very loosely to form the outer rose petals, then I sunk the organza band to the back.

The finished flower is a bit disordered because of the instable buttonhole stitches but charming. I fixed the outer petals with a few stitches in sewing thread which has the colour of the background.

post3-200615

For comparison, I did two other variants. The upper one with straight stitches emerging from the middle of the circle as spokes is (I believe) the traditional way to weave a ribbon rose. for the second one, I made a spider wheel as base. two spokes need to close to each other because you have to treat them as one to end up with an uneven number of spokes.

woven wheel roses

the straight stitch wheel was easy to weave, you have to find the right tension that creates neatly folded petals and that’s it.
The next picture shows how the spider wheel is woven. This again, is somewhat hard because it is not fixed in the middle.

post5-200615

No here are the finished roses. the spider wheel rose (lower, right)was imho no a sucess, the other two are charming, each in their own way.

woven rose


Sampler, Part 3

OK, I guess the text of these posts gets boring, but I have no idea how to make that un-boring (is this even a word?)

So here we go. This section shows some more TAST stitches, buttonhole wheel cup, and some other buttonhole wheel variant, namely whipped and woven buttonhole wheels.

The last row is my take on beaded feathered chain stitch.

sampler1-24-05-15


%d bloggers like this: