Tag Archives: hand embroidery

I’m still out there..

Hello, I know it’s been a while, sorry for that. Life got in the way, and I wasn’t stitching that much anyway.

I hope things will get much more interesting again. I started to work on Sharons TAST challenge again, and I signed up for her sumptuos surfaces class. Here are some spring pics from a walk in the nearby forests.  The frogs are fire-bellied toads, the tadpoles are most probably future grass frogs. Stitching soon to come.

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Tutorial – Handmade Hem on Aida Fabric

I did stitch a lot and am almost done with chatchup, but I’m away from my scanner and don’t have good light for photographs right now. So I show you what else I’ve been up to.

I like that sampler better now than in the beginning, but I long for some on grid work anyway, to make things easier and faster. So, my next sampler is going to be a sampler an aida band. So I bought a ready-made band, but of course the short sides need some finishing anyway.

I’m showing you how I’ve done it.

First, I secured the edge with nun stitch, but you coulod as well glue or machine stitch it. I know it doesn’t look good but it will be invisible in the finished piece.

I wanted to create a sort of tube where I can insert hardware for hanging the samokler. So I folded the fabric to create the tube. I made the piece inside the tube as wide as the tube, otherwise it might show.

Next step is to draw out the threads for the drawn thread hem. For that, I cut them in the middle of the fabric strip and carefully drew them out of the warp going from the middle to the sides. On store-bought aida bands it is almost impossible to draw the threads out of the woven sides, so I glue the weft threads there later to secure them. this will be on the back of the work anyway.

Next, I pinned the fabric in place before the stitching.

For stitching, I turned the work over to stitch from the right side. Usually you do the hem stitches from the wrong side for a cleaner look, but on aida and other easiely countable fabric, I never manage to hit the correct holes in the fabric on the side I’m not lookfing at, so it won’t slook clean at all.

Well, here’s how the plain hem stitch is done.

Now this s the finished thing. It still needs cutting off the loose ends, I want to glue over them once more before that. I know there’s a mistake in it, but can’t be assed to undo it.


TAST – Barred Chain Stitch

This week’s TAST stitch is barred chain stitch and alternating barred chain stitch.
got to know this stitch during the first TAST and use it a lot for ragged lines.

This week I mostly spent gardening. Spring is slowly arriving here, the bushes are still bare, and I spent a lot of the time cutting the bushes in my garden to shape. So I stidtche some bushes. I’m not sure if I’m leaving this section as is or add some more, but I wanted to post something in time this time round.


TAST – Detatched Chain Stitch

This week’s TAST is chain stitch.es I’m showing an old sample again. Don’t have as much time for this as I would like. Just enjoy the eye candy.

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TAST: Chevron Stitch

This week’s TAST stitch is

chevron stitch

.

I did do herringbone stitch, just no time for posting. Just in case it pans out the same this week, I show you my almost finished chevron stitch piece from last TAST.

Mind the top- I used chevron stitch as a drawn thread stitch here (for securing the edges) and waffle stitch, which is very similar to chevron stitch.


TAST 12 – Cretan Stitch

So this week’s TAST stitch is cretan stitch.
Since my sold sampler is full, I started a new one on the next band-like thing I found that doesn’t need prep work before I can begin. I’m not sure about it at all. I added some browns to the color scheme to coordinate it with the first one and keep it from looking saccharine.

This was my cretan stitch sampler for the first TAST challenge. I can’t decide if I’m calling it done or add some more.


Some more Buttonhole Stitch and Feather Stitch

Oh my, it’s only the 4th week of TAST and I’m already behind. Well, here is some more buttonhole stitch, and my efforts on feather stitch.

Also, those are almost the last sections of my band sampler. I only have a little space left to add a date.

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The heart is detatched buttonhole filling.

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Next Sampler Sections

Well, here are the next 2 sections of my sampler. The lilac trellises and the green pattern are taken directly from the book, the rest is wild experiments.


New Sampler

Now here is what you all were (probably) waiting for – embroidery content. Yes I wanted to get back into it. Yes my UFO boxes looked somewhat unappealing. So what’s a girl to do? Yes, let’s start something new. A sampler, like ever so often.

I recently gifted myself wit “The Stitches of Creative Embroidery” by Jaqueline Enthoven. I decided I would get most out of reading it if I tried the new to me stitches at once, so I started a sampler. It is made out of a strip of deco hessian from a dollar store, some strands of floss and stranded cotton from my stash and a few sock yarn scraps from recent knitting projects.

here you can see the whole thing:

The finished parts of it:

 


Finish: Waiting for Spring

Waiting for Spring
Anchor embroidery floss and valdani pearl cotton on non-evenweave linen
roughly DIN-A-5-Size

I finished this some time ago, and finally got round to washing and blocking it. Sadly, I could not remove all of the violet iron-on marker. And that after some of it bleached on me before I could complete the stitching. I don’t think I’ll be using the darn thing again. One of these days I’ll have to invest in a light table.

I’m calling it Waiting for Spring, because when I designed it last year it was march and it was still snowing. I think it is kinda symbolic that the bulb i’m expecting to grow is “empty”, not the quite bleak background.
The background is long-armed cross stitch, the soil a mix of diverse structured stitches, the fillings inside the bulb long and short stitch.

Here are links to substancial in-Progress postings:
The design process
The finished design and the transfer to fabric
A closeup of the needlewoven bars in the soil


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